Thursday, May 31, 2007

Submariners, Sunburn and High Incidence States

Even trees can be sunburnt. So, although sunburn rates are lower for some people (Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, American Indians/native Alaskans) they also report sunburns, though they often aren't considered at high risk.

The percentage of sunburned U.S. adults rose from 31.8% in 1999 to 33.7% in 2004, based on three national surveys conducted in 1999, 2003, and 2004.

The CDC lists the percentage of white adults in each state and U.S. territory reporting sunburns at least once in the previous year. The most recent year for which state statistics are available was 2004. Two regions with large submariner populations, Hawaii and Guam, did not report sunburn statistics in the 2004 survey. The worst ten states in order of decreasing sunburn incidence were as follows:

1. U.S. Virgin Islands: 50.1%
2. Utah: 49.9%
3. Minnesota: 48.7%
4. Wisconsin: 48.6%
5. Idaho: 48.5%
6. Wyoming: 48.3%
7. Vermont: 47.1%
8. Nebraska: 46.9%
9. North Dakota: 46.4%
10. South Dakota: 46.1%

Puerto Rico was dead last at #45. Where do you think Connecticut ranked in the survey? (Hint: in the top 25).

Does anyone know when sunburn was first discouraged in Navy Regs?

Sunburns were more common among men than among women. That may be due to time spent outdoors or greater sun protection among women, notes the CDC.

The only sunburn I ever got in the Navy was in location number one above.

One study could be a mixed blessing for submariners. Published in 1990, it included 4.6 million naval personnel. RESULT: melanoma (deadliest skin cancer) occurred most frequently on those sailors who worked inside. Those who worked alternately inside and outside had the lowest risk. The study, entitled "Occupational Sunlight Exposure and Melanoma in the U.S. Navy," was conducted by doctors Frank and Cedric Garland (University of California School of Medicine at San Diego).

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A single sunburn can increase likelihood of developing skin cancer, according to the CDC. Here are its sunburn prevention tips:

Wear a wide-brimmed hat.
Cover up while in the sun.
Seek the shade.
Wear wrap-around sunglasses.
Avoid the sun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher.

The Navy even adds a few more:

APPLY ZINC OXIDE CREAM TO NOSE AND LIPS.
BE SURE TO WEAR SUNGLASSES THAT BLOCK ULTRAVIOLET RAYS,/ESPECIALLY WHILE SUNBATHING OR USING TANNING BOOTHS.
WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND A HAT ON SUNNY ANDCLOUDY/BRIGHT DAYS.

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1 Comments:

At 01 June, 2007 12:44, Blogger Old Gary said...

I was told by a dermatologist that a naturally oily skin also helps prevent sunburns and melanoma.

 

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